AUTHOR INTERVIEW 64 – Jo M. Sekimonyo

Jo M. Sekimonyo

United States

Jo M. Sekimonyo is a Congolese born, American fermented and globally bottled theorist, human rights activist, political economist, and social philosopher. 
He has been a strong critic of mainstream economists, „these clown shows that chip away the substance of economic disparity dialogues”.

On the Labor Theory of Value, Sekimonyo argues that in the twenty-first century, instead of the average number of labor hours, the quality of the means necessary in an enterprise to produce a commodity or provide a service establishes relative prices. 
Much of his writing has been concerned with „economic injustice, poverty, and egalitarianism”.

His work has been translated into over fifteen languages.

Sekimonyo argued that the ability of individuals to understand the world and creatively respond to challenges that confront humanity is key to alleviate poverty. 
He facilitates several workshops and seminars every year throughout the developing world geared towards stimulating debates around global social issues and mainstream economic theories.

His more recent work deals with an alternative to capitalism; 
ethosism.

https://www.sekimonyo.com/

https://www.facebook.com/jo.m.sekim
In the global environment of trade and commerce, humankind appears to have given up its natural journey of progression to improve the social order and universally accepted capitalism. But, whilst the richest continue to accumulate vast amounts of wealth, inequality grows and the poorest still live in extreme poverty. This passionate, academic study will go on to present that socialism is just another means of enslaving society under the capitalist model. So, is there a new social, political, and economic arrangement that fits the twenty-first century reality? Ethosism looks at the fact that in the twenty-first century more people than ever before have the means to acquire and own their means of engagement, participation, or involvement in an enterprise. As the result, capitalism, socialism, and communism have lost their raison d’etres.
By examining the foremost upheavals of the twenty-first century, wealth inequality and climate change, plus social class conflicts resulting from the paradigm shift, my conviction is that we are in dire need of a morales nuvem consensus which will herald new social, commerce, intermerce, and political covenants that will enable us to successfully traverse the twenty-first century and beyond.

Romelia: WHAT IS THE MOST VALUABLE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE BEEN GIVEN ABOUT WRITING?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: One should not run away from what makes them authentically themselves when they write. Even when I try, I always fail to dilute my voice or my passion because my vision comes at an intricately high tone. A few layers add to the challenge of raving against capitalism, communism, and socialism. I am at same time black, moreover African and using a provocative and generous writing style sooner or later succeeds in transforming what is wrongly presumed by many as anti-imperialism noises into a relevant signal. The masters of mass manipulation tend to obscure their inconsistent logical fallacies to pitch blind supporters and brown-nosers into their trenches to duel it out in cerebral scrimmages while they watch. 

Romelia: HOW MANY HOURS A DAY DO YOU WRITE?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: I do not assign a certain number of hours a day writing. As an author and a social critic such a concept does not make sense to me.  I often torture my mind for hours for a few lines after dark until the sun begins to impose its presence.

Romelia: WHOM DO YOU TRUST FOR OBJECTIVE AND CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM OF YOUR WORK?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: When you write a book to be read not a gimmick, you must embrace your imperfections and accept insolence… As I write to generate debates among readers, it’s not a matter of trust but rather an easy way to facilitate my search for new questions to answer on my next books or during forums I organize. Everyone of us has more than one story that other would be interested to hear.

Romelia: HOW DID YOU BECOME INVOLVED WITH THE SUBJECT OR THEME OF YOUR BOOK?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: During my tour of the shittiest parts of the world, I was frustrated every time people there mentioned in their arguments extolling western economic priests of a dead religion who still cling to out-of-date economic models that have been proven as false as the theories they were based on. At the same time, I was repulsed by western groups who were devoid of the power of observation standing next to the very people they proclaim they wanted to help. And there is also the fact that the rich are getting richer, the poor are getting poorer on a massive global scale. And then, bookworms and apprentice druids alike complained it seemed that I spent the time yelling at them in my previous book, Economic Jihad: Putting the Kibosh on Antiquated Social Axioms Defining Us, without clearly explaining what I coined to be the right alternative to capitalism and all other dead white men’s economic and social ideologies. I had to take a detour before I finished my next project “Don’t Have Sex with An Activist” to put out a book in which my rants match the arguments against Victorian packed biases and then walk through what ethosism is.

Romelia: WHAT CULTURAL VALUE DO YOU SEE IN WRITING?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: I sincerely believe that the ability of individuals to understand the world and to respond creatively to the challenges facing humanity is essential to tackle socio-economic injustices. Writing is a way of taunting our collective conscience to commit to containing humanity’s passion for doing the wrong things right.

Romelia: WHAT WERE YOUR GOALS AND INTENTIONS IN THIS BOOK, AND HOW WELL DO YOU FEEL YOU ACHIEVED THEM?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: I always spill my verity and discordance not to enrapture the audience but to summon contemporaneous probity and to add my voice to clamoring crowds disrelishing the modern-day social and political economy constructs. Technology has made us efficient slaves. The heavy cost of efficiency has shifted for moneyers to the self-enslaved. Sadly, humanity has yet to spot the dynamism worsening  and drastically skewing the wealth and power to one side.  I can no longer pretend how incompatible the old ways of social, commerce, trade, and political arrangement like capitalism or socialism with what has happened to humankind in the 21st century. For me, letting out all the anger stored inside of my brain was sincerely a cathartic exercise. In this term, I achieved my goal.

Romelia:   WHAT DO YOU THINK MOST CHARACTERIZES YOUR WRITING?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: In the book I point the catalyzers of the ballooning the social, economic, and social gap between the gang of robber barons and captains of industry and the rest. A global system underlying the extremely unequal distribution of wealth and power has kept the profane views of the laboring class and hierarchical arrangements between commerce and trade actors the same. I do not stop there. I wisely scribbled a prescription which describes ethosism a new paradigm.

Romelia: ARE THERE VOCABULARY WORDS OR CONCEPTS IN YOUR BOOK THAT MAY BE NEW TO READERS? DEFONE SOME OF THOSE.

Jo M. Sekimonyo: The main one is Ethosism, what I see as the inevitable alternative to capitalism. There is also the concept to point out that the notion of commerce does not rightly paint out what we do mostly in the 21st century. I can throw in here the term Ideaism, an alternative to democracy.

Romelia: ARE THERE UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS OR IDEAS FEATURED IN YOUR BOOK? IF SO, DISCUSS THEM.

Jo M. Sekimonyo: Not only the elite, but everyday persons throughout the globe are purchasing their means of participation, engagement, or involvement in an enterprise or discussion is key feature of the twenty-first-century paradigm shift. As rules are still set, moneyers get the lion share of the efforts of the majority of the outputs while  the laboring class are being demoted into the working poor slaving for hourly wages. Therefore, we ought to rethink the way we share the surplus.

Romelia: ARE THERE MISCONCEPTIONS THAT PEOPLE HAVE ABOUT YOUR BOOK? IF SO, EXPLAIN.

Jo M. Sekimonyo: I am in a pursuit of intellectual relevance in the global discussion on socioeconomic injustice. However, from time to time I find myself inept to suppress my rage against daily realities of inequity seen between the largely poor population and the small elite stomach-turning delusion of opulence in my home country. Potential readers seem to presume that my writing is simply a reflection of my heritage. It is more so a recalibrating way of making voices heard of those often left out in global discussions regarding socioeconomic injustice.

Romelia: HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT EBOOKS VS PRINT BOOKS AND ALTERNATIVE VS CONVENTIONAL PUBLISHING?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: We write to be read. Thus, your book needs to be bought to be read. Print books are the best for books as a product. A physical copy travels from hand to hand. eBooks are the best for books as an idea. Even though technology provides an substantive way to go indie, the tricks of getting the right exposure and placement in a bookstore are still dictated by the same conventional ways. With time, conventional publishing is going to swallow the relevant part of the alternative publishing avenues as they have a great ability to do so. Authors still have to get seriously involved in all aspect of bringing their voice to the public.

Romelia: WHAT MAKES YOUR BOOK STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: As I’ve often voiced, any form of expression that ceases to be an experience and becomes an art form loses its glowing divinity. In the same spirit this book is an experience, not an artistic acrobatic exercise meant for viewing to remind you that it exists. This is not part of a series, rather, it illuminates the new 21st century socially constructed paradigm.

Romelia: WHAT PROJECTS ARE YOU WORKING ON AT THE PRESENT? WHAT DO YOUR PLANS FOR FUTURE PROJECTS INCLUDE?

Jo M. Sekimonyo: I am finishing “Don’t have sex with an activist” which was previously titled “Insomnia”. Once again, I cannot just bring myself to accept intolerance or prejudice as normal life. On my next more personal release, I press on to reimagine our realities instead of agonizing about the origin of them. The older I get, no matter how much I try, the more I fail in gagging my anguish and anger over parochialism in all its shapes and forms.

Romelia: describe yourself in a few sentences. Tell us something we do not know about you and something you hate about the world.

Jo M. Sekimonyo: Ok I will try. I am a gumbo of sorts: Congolese roots by birth, American fermented into adulthood, and globally bottled into maturity. I am a pleasure and agony canvasser, and a nonconformist ideological Mambi. I no longer pore over contemporary literature like when I was innocent. I could care less about echoing or reciting past and present hopes or nightmares. I now continually tune my acuities by living. To get a cerebral high in an unremorseful fashion one must get deeply poignant with themselves. My mother, who has a shocking compassion for others despite her humble means influenced me. It was not long ago that I came to the realization that in a subconscious fashion, that my mother’s reality is related   my crusade against socioeconomic injustices.

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