AUTHOR INTERVIEW 110 – Miriam Gaudin

Miriam Gaudin

Lafayette, Louisiana, US

Age 42

I am Miriam Gaudin and have a B.S. in Child and Family Studies, with a Minor in Psychology. I have an Associates Degree in Business Administration.

I was born in 1978 in the compact town of St. Martinville, LA, which is full of Acadian Culture. I enjoy writing and enjoy raising awareness for Kallmann Syndrome. Kallmann Syndrome is a rare genetic condition which causes the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to not produce oestrogen, progesterone, and testosterone.
Annie’s Story A Life Without Smell is about a woman who was born with no sense smell. She shares her journey and struggles about living a life never being able to smell. Later on she is diagnosed with Kallmann Syndrome, which is a rare condition that affects roughly 34,000 people world wide. The book is raw, cruel, and heartbreaking but gives a message of hope and strength.
When the symptoms came to light about Covid-19 where the patient can lose their sense of smell, I thought is was important to offer hope to the ones struggling with losing their smell or suffering from Kallmann’s but not yet diagnosed or have a name to put with the condition.
This book is NOT intended to make a profit off of Covid-19, but to offer hope and advice throughout the story. Many will relate with it, even if you can still smell. My writing style is not like others, but it is my own. There is a reference section and a glossary that defines Kallmann Syndrome, and an abundance of information/resources.
My hope is that this series will raise awareness for Kallmann’s Syndrome, offer hope to readers that struggle from every walks of life including but not limited to infertility, lack of/absence of the sense of smell (acquired or congenital), romance readers.
When I wrote Annie’s Story, I made it simple enough for people understand it easier, because Kallmann’s is complicated in and of itself.

Romelia: WHAT IS THE MOST DIFFICULT PART OF YOUR ARTISTIC PROCESS?

Miriam Gaudin: The most difficult part of my process is actually my writing style. Some say I write like I talk, which is fine because it’s me.

Romelia: DOES YOUR FAMILY SUPPORT YOUR CAREER AS A WRITER?

Miriam Gaudin: My family is warming up to the idea, more sales will make them more confident and supportive of me.

Romelia: IF YOU HAD TO DO SOMETHING DIFFERENTLY AS A CHILD OR TEENAGER TO BECOME A BETTER WRITER AS AN ADULT, WHAT WOULD YOU DO?

Miriam Gaudin: The only thing I would do is start writing sooner. I’ve always had a story to tell, but it wasn’t until my 30s that I started.

Romelia: HOW LONG ON AVERAGE DOES IT TAKE YOU TO WRITE A BOOK?

Miriam Gaudin: It depends on the topic. For Annie’s Story A Life Without  Smell it took roughly a month to write the book. I already knew what to write, and spent the majority of the month doing research and talking to others who were born without the sense of smell.

Romelia: DO YOU BELIEVE IN WRITER’S BLOCK? 

Miriam Gaudin: Yes, and have experienced it quite a few times.

Romelia: AT WHAT POINT DO YOU THINK SOMEONE SHOULD CALL THEMSELVES A WRITER?

Miriam Gaudin: A writer is someone who writes in a journal, poems, anything creative.

Romelia: WHAT DIFFERENCE DO YOU SEE BETWEEN A WRITER AND AN AUTHOR?

Miriam Gaudin: The difference between both is that a writer writes, and an author publishes it.

Romelia: HOW DO YOU PROCESS AND DEAL WITH NEGATIVE BOOK REVIEWS?

Miriam Gaudin: My first bad review was devastating.  I cried and vented, and cried some more. The next day I read it again to see if I could take a lesson from the review or just leave it alone. A wise friend told me that even the best authors get bad reviews and congratulated me on being a “true author”.

Even though the sting was initially there, I realized that I didn’t write to make readers happy I wrote to tell a story. Some may love it, and some may hate it. I no longer cry about bad reviews, 1. It’s their opinion, 2. I am not wasting my time with getting beat up over 1 comment.

Romelia: WHAT IS THE MOST DIFFICULT PART OF YOUR WRITING PROCESS?

Miriam Gaudin: I believe the most difficult part of my writing process is dialogue. I am not a fan of the “” or he said, she said, he replied, she replied nonsense. That isn’t who I am and it feels so unrealistic.

Romelia: HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WRITING OR WHEN DID YOU START?

Miriam Gaudin: I’ve been writing for 12 years now, it started out as therapy then blossomed into publishing Annie’s Story.

Romelia: WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A WRITER WORKING ON THEIR FIRST BOOK?

Miriam Gaudin: You are the author, write your own rules, but most of all Don’t Give Up! If you find yourself reaching your writer block point stop writing for a few hours and go do something fun. If you are truly an author, don’t write to please people, write to inspire, arouse, break hearts, etc.

Romelia: WHAT, TO YOU, ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT ELEMENTS OF GOOD WRITING?

 Miriam Gaudin: Freewriting, then Outline from the freewriting and Content.

Romelia: WHAT COMES FIRST FOR YOU – THE PLOT OR THE CHARACTERS – AND WHY?

Miriam Gaudin: Characters, mainly because as I choose the characters to represent what I want to discuss or write about. It also gives the opportunity to design the plot around the characters.

Romelia: HOW DO YOU DEVELOP YOUR PLOT AND CHARACTERS?

Miriam Gaudin: The first thing I do is research my topic I am wanting to write on, then I free-write. I ask myself what character/s do I need to get my point across to the reader effectively. I always write the ending first and then go back to the beginning with the end in mind.

Romelia: WHEN DID YOU FIRST CALL YOURSELF A WRITER?

Miriam Gaudin: I was around 12 when I started writing. It was strictly for counseling homework, but eventually, it evolved into something more.

Romelia: HOW DO YOU USE SOCIAL MEDIA AS AN AUTHOR?

Miriam Gaudin: I use Social Media for marketing and have a page specifically for Annie’s Story Series.

Romelia: WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE AND LEAST FAVORITE PART OF PUBLISHING?

Miriam Gaudin: The favorite is definitely seeing that email saying my book is live. To be quite honest, I am usually nervous until then. My least favorite part of publishing is formatting the pages. I have learned quickly how they expect it to be formatted so I use the same page size and specifics.

Romelia: WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO AN AUTHOR WHO WANTED TO DESIGN THEIR OWN COVER?

Miriam Gaudin: I say go for it, especially if you have an absolute idea about what you want your cover to look like. For some, it may be easier to hire a cover designer. I chose to make my own cover, because honestly that book is “my baby” and I should have the final say on my cover.

Romelia: HOW MANY BOOKS HAVE YOU WRITTEN AND WHICH IS YOUR FAVORITE?

Miriam Gaudin: I’ve written 4 books, three are short reads but bring much impact. My favorite book I wrote is Annie’s Story. It has very special meaning to me not only as an author but as a patient that lives with the actual disease.

Romelia: WHAT PART OF THE BOOK DID YOU HAVE THE HARDEST TIME WRITING?

Miriam Gaudin: The sections that were my own story were the hardest to write. I dreaded it, it tore off the band aid on the part of my soul that I buried so deep. Though it hurt; it was almost cleansing in a way.

Romelia: WHAT PART OF THE BOOK WAS THE MOST FUN TO WRITE?

Miriam Gaudin: The most fun part of writing was the relationship between Annie and Nat. They were inseparable just like my best friend and I are.

Romelia: WHICH OF THE CHARACTERS DO YOU RELATE TO THE MOST AND WHY?

Miriam Gaudin: I definitely relate to Annie, because some of Annie’s story is my story; just changed around. Annie overcomes so much in her life and she perseveres.

Romelia: IF YOU’RE PLANNING A SEQUEL. CAN YOU SHARE A TINY BIT ABOUT YOUR PLANS FOR IT?

Miriam Gaudin: I am currently writing the 2nd book of Annie’s Story Trilogy. Book one ended in a cliffhanger so Annie’s Story: Annie finds her brother will be a continuation. This one will focus on the stories of the men suffering from Kallmann Syndrome. It will still have drama, romance, crime, and lots of good stuff.

Romelia: TELL US SOMETHING FUNNY ABOUT YOUR ADULT LIFE.

Miriam Gaudin: My adult life is chaotic, but I find the time to visit with my cousin and my friend, once the three of us are together, all we have to say is ‘mile three’, and my cousin starts giggling for hours and cannot stop. We laugh so much we often get lost and go in circles. This is what happened on our last trip. The GPS was taking us to a state park instead of the Indian mounds. I didn’t know how long we were going to pass up Epps Baptist Church that day. We still laugh about it and the ‘three-mile’.

Romelia: DESCRIBE YOURSELF IN A FEW SENTENCES. TELL US SOMETHING WE DO NOT KNOW ABOUT YOU AND SOMETHING YOU HATE ABOUT THE WORLD.

Miriam Gaudin: I am a strong woman and a huge introvert, if someone invites me anywhere I clam up. However, when I am alone and traveling alone I am at complete peace. I also camp alone, but now I have my service dog so that’s a bonus! I juggle being an author, caregiver, grad student, and Aunt. The most thing I hate in this world is how everyone is so busy pointing out everyone else’s faults and not seeing their own.

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